Billingslea Media
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The latest news and industry trends

Facebook and Instagram Crash For The Day
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It was the deafening silence heard all around the world that made Millennials gasp for air….The silence of not one, but TWO major social media outlets going down at the same time. Wednesday proved to be a difficult day for social media driven people around the world. But it wasn’t just Millennials that were going berserk about the outage. Businesses who rely heavily on social media were also panicking just a bit. Many business rely on these free platforms to provide updates and information about their products and services. Without access to social media, a business can easily be crippled by the loss of potential sales.

The outage is a huge reminder of why we as business owners can never rely solely on one platform to share our message. While many of us rely heavily on social media; we fail to remember that we don’t OWN those platforms. We simply “rent” space from the internet giants. The ability to customize our pages and post personalized content gives us the false perception of ownership. But as we all saw on Wednesday, the ability to use social media for promoting our brands is not always up to us. As a business owner it’s important to have additional measures in place for reaching our target market. Having a dedicated email list, a blog, or even strong offline connections allows us to have that additional layer of security that’s needed in order to remain in contact with our customers.

While social media may be a great free tool for accessing potential and existing clients, it’s up to us to take that extra step in making sure that we are able to communicate with our audience at all times.

Were you affected negatively by the social media outage? What measures do you have in place in the event that your social media pages go down?

March Goals

 

The beginning of the year came and went like a flash of lightning. It’s hard to believe that it’s already March and we are getting close to the end of the 1st Quarter. If you haven’t hit all of your business goals yet, don’t worry...there is still time to regroup and accomplish some valuable things for the sake of your business.

A lot of people get overwhelmed because they either create goals that are unrealistic for completion within a certain time frame or not specific enough to keep you on track for completion. As the age old business model says, Goals should be S.M.A.R.T : Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic, and Timely.  Declaring that you want to make $100,000 for the year is totally doable. But saying “I want to make 100,000 this year” but not knowing what products and services you are going to sell, how much you are selling them for, and who you are selling them to is unrealistic and sets you up for disappointment.

Even your small goals should be realistic. They should be related to the overall bottom line within your business. If your goal is to move to a brick and mortar location, it should be tied to a “why”. Will moving to a physical location help increase your sales? Will it give you more foot traffic? Don’t make a plan to move to a physical location just because you think it “looks” like a good idea. Create the goal to move because it is tied to something that benefits your business. Once you’ve decided on that goal, figure out the action steps to get you there, and make sure that they are SMART goals.

This is the perfect time for Spring Cleaning your business. In the next couple of days take an assessment of your business, its operations systems, and how well your products and services are doing. Figure out what areas need improvement, and what you can do to ensure that growth is taking place. Engage in activities that are strategic in helping you fine tune your business.

What things do you need to spring clean in your business? What areas need some special attention?

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Small Business Saturday Brings Economic Growth




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Since Small Business Saturday started,

U.S. customers have reported spending

an estimated total of $85 billion at

independent retailers and restaurants —

that's $85 billion over 8 days alone. (AmericanExpress.com)




The Small Business Saturday movement across America shines light on the heart of our growing cities - the small business owner. In 2017 it was reported that for every $100 spent at a small business, $68 of that revenue supported local economic activity; as opposed to only $48 when spent at large retailers. The growing number of small business owners present the promise of opportunity for our cities; but only if the public puts effort into supporting them.



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Local businesses are what make cities unique. They are also the source of economic empowerment for many families. Being able to have control over your finances, and the freedom to create a legacy of business activity for your family is a huge part of the ‘American Dream’. International business experts like Gary Vaynerchuk have been very vocal over the years about how building a thriving small business changed the trajectory of their lives. Vaynerchuk worked in his parents local store for years, and turned that experience into a phenomenal media giant. The success of the family’s small business was the foundation of his success as an international business expert.

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Want to support local businesses? Here are a couple of ways to get involved




Small changes in consumer purchasing behavior could have long lasting positive effects on their respective cities. Not only does it allow families to build financial success, but it also provides jobs for others, and reduces environmental waste by reducing the costs of transport and shipping. Even better, patronizing a small business gives you a chance to find unique goods that you won’t always find at big-box retailers.

For a list of small businesses in your area, visit the American Express Small Business Saturday page.

Does your family have a favorite local retailer? What are some of the benefits you’ve seen from shopping at small businesses?

Riding The Apple Train
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Today Apple unveiled their biggest change to the iPad since its debut. The new iPad is purported to be sleeker, lighter, and much more eco-friendly. It’s made out of 100% recycled aluminum and can even charge your iPhone while in use.The downside? It’s the most expensive iPad to replace.

With all of the bells and whistles, and the ability to use iPhone features such as FaceTime, the new iPad is definitely a technological gem. But with that also comes a hefty price tag that most Apple customers will probably still pay. Why? Brand loyalty. EXTREME brand loyalty. Apple has taken the simplicity of picking a cell phone and turned it into a sub-culture of loyal supporters. One does not simply use Apple products. You become an Apple user. It’s the biggest digital divide in modern history, with iPhone and Android users arguing over which devices have the best features.

The thing that Apple has done to separate itself from the Android market is to create a culture of exclusivity. Every single thing that you do on an iPhone has to be done within its suite of services. Every app that you download comes from the online Apple store, your music comes from iTunes, and if you have an issue with your device you go to the Apple store. With an Android you have Samsung, HTC, and countless others who share an operating system but don’t give you that feeling of exclusivity. There is no internal culture associated with owning an HTC, and device users don’t necessarily use any other HTC products.

The closest comparison to the Apple subculture is the growth of Google products. Google has put more effort into marketing its Google Pixel phone, and just recently introduced companion products like the Pixel tablet to create that same type of brand loyalty that Apple has with its customers. With Google already dominating applications such as Gmail and Google Drive, there just may be a chance for the takeover by ‘Googlers’.

Does your business suffer from a lack of brand loyalty? What are some ways that you can create a loyal subculture for your audience?